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Updates from November, 2009

  • sphereboy 3:30 pm on November 19, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    This comes at the perfect time as i plan my upcoming vacation :) enjoy.

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 12:57 pm on November 19, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via brandflakesforbreakfast by darryl ohrt on 11/19/09


    Don’t you wish they made a bedside alarm clock version of this scroll bar clock? Pure coding genius.

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 12:49 pm on November 19, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via The Selvedge Yard by JP on 11/18/09


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    Just look at what 10,000 clams bought back in 1951.  Go ahead, eat your heart out–  I am.

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    LIFE Archive: California House

    Date taken: August 1951
    Photographer: Carl Mydans

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    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 4:31 pm on November 18, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via Daisy Whitney by Daisy Whitney on 11/18/09


    The phenomenally talented author John Green has said 90% of the words in his first draft are NOT in his final draft.


    Which is really a huge amount of words to delete right? I mean, that’s a daunting freaking number. That’s the kind of number that makes you want to curl up, suck your thumb and not write again. Because WHAT WAS THE POINT then of the first draft????

    The point? Well, it’s just the process.

    Now, I’m not going to claim to be an expert. But this is John Green we’re talking about. And he’s pretty much the top of the game when it comes to writing most excellent novels for teens. And all I can say as someone who has just gone through revisions is this — HE IS RIGHT.

    I didn’t technically track the words added and words deleted in “The Mockingbirds.” But it’s already gone through several revisions and will still go through line edits and copy edits and probably a few more tiny story tweaks. But here’s why I agree with John.

    1. Sept. – Nov 2008: I wrote first draft of The Mockingbirds back when it was called The Poster Child and didn’t even include a secret-society at a prestigious boarding school that operates as the judge, jury and muscle for the entire student body. Yeah, that’s right — what MADE the story wasn’t even in it.

    2. Nov. 2008-February 2009: Revised novel to add in the Mockingbirds.

    3. February 2009: Revise novel for agent to submit to editor

    4. April 2009: Revise ending

    5. July 2009: Revise beginning (novel sold in August)

    6. August 2009: Add in some new scenes based on conversation with editor

    7. November 2009: Revise for editor

    So that’s seven different drafts so far and I think it’s safe to say every single line and word has been tinkered with.

    How many words from your first draft remained in your final draft?

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 4:10 pm on November 18, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via Inside Facebook by Justin Smith on 11/18/09


    Last night, Facebook announced that after a week-long “notice and comment” period, it has decided to adopt the updated privacy policy it initially proposed in late October.

    Because the proposed policy did not receive over 7,000 comments — the threshold Facebook laid out in its latest Statement of Rights and Responsibilities — the new policy did not go to site-wide user voting as happened earlier this year. In fact, the English version of the draft only got about 1,000 comments total.

    What changes does the new policy bring about? As we detailed when the new policy was proposed, part of the intent with this draft was to provide a “clearer and more comprehensive” description of what the policies actually mean.

    Facebook also added a blurb on “location” in which Facebook says it will treat your location as subject to your overall privacy settings (share with “everyone,” just “friends,” etc.). So Facebook is preparing, at least legally, for more location-based services:

    Location Information. When you share your location with others or add a location to something you post, we treat that like any other content you post (for example, it is subject to your privacy settings). If we offer a service that supports this type of location sharing we will present you with an opt-in choice of whether you want to participate.

    In terms of advertising, Facebook has included language that allows it to provide general statistics about users who interact with ads, but not personally identifiable information. Facebook also says:

    We may institute programs with advertising partners and other websites in which they share information with us:

    • We may ask advertisers to tell us how our users responded to the ads we showed them (and for comparison purposes, how other users who didn’t see the ads acted on their site). This data sharing, commonly known as “conversion tracking,” helps us measure our advertising effectiveness and improve the quality of the advertisements you see.
    • We may receive information about whether or not you’ve seen or interacted with certain ads on other sites in order to measure the effectiveness of those ads.

    Other notable reiterations of previous policies include what Facebook has to say to developers. “We do not guarantee that Platform will always be free,” according to the document.

    Overall, the new policy does not represent any major shift in Facebook’s privacy philosophy, but is a part of its overall effort to simplify its privacy and legal documentation.

    More politicians and watchdog organizations are paying attention to Facebook’s privacy policies too. The Privacy Commissioner of Canada has pushed the company to adopt more detailed rules about a number of practices, including better informing users what data they are sharing, and with whom.

    And just today, Jim Gamble of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, criticized Facebook for not placing the CEOP “report” button on its website. Facebook responded, “We are confident that the Ceop button is an excellent solution for sites that have not invested in as robust a reporting infrastructure as Facebook has in place and one we continue to improve.”

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 1:14 pm on November 18, 2009 | 0 Permalink


    This week Twitter has moved in to a new and very stilish headquarter. The new office is still in San Francisco, now with much more space and with a lot of decorating sttuff in all the rooms, elements such as “@” and “birds” are everywhere! The office is really amazing and that’s why we decided to bring to you a collection of pictures from the Twitter’s HQ. Detail, the photos were taken by their employees.

    This space was previous the Bebo’s office, and Sara Morishige Williams was the brain behind the interior design. Very simple, wonderful colors and beautiful workspaces, this is what you will see on this pictures. Now tell me, who does not want to work in there?

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    The new Twiiter's headquarter in SF

    About the author

    User picture

    I’m from Brazil, co-founder of Zee with Fabio. Nowadays I like to play with Fireworks, Photoshop and improve my skills in CSS. If you wanna request some posts, please feel free to contact me or follow on Twitter.

    Sponsored Links:

    Buy Abduzeedo T-shirts

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 5:39 pm on November 17, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via Mashable! by Christina Warren on 11/17/09


    theMix-smLast month, we wrote about Coca-Cola’s Expedition 206 campaign, in which the company uses social media to pick three individuals to travel the world in 2010, who in turn visit all 206 markets where Coca-Cola has a presence.

    Along the way, the “Happiness Ambassadors” will take photos, make videos, send out updates on Twitter and Facebook and connect with individuals around the world.

    Yesterday, at the World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, GA, Coca-Cola announced the winning Expedition 206 team. Online voters from all over the world picked Tony Martin, Kelly Ferris and Antonio Santiago — Team The MIX — to go on the remarkable trip. Coca-Cola invited Mashable to the event and we got a chance to talk with the winners and some of the Coca-Cola team members who put the whole campaign together.


    Big Brands Go Big With Social Media


    We’re constantly seeing new examples of big companies — and big brands — embracing and using social media to connect with customers. Still, it’s impressive to see a company the size of Coca-Cola, not only talk the talk, but actually follow-through. At lunch yesterday, we got a chance to hear about the origins for Expedition 206 and it became very clear that Coca-Cola gets social media.

    The idea for Expedition 206 was kick-started by Clyde Tuggle, the senior vice president of Global Public Affairs and Communications for Coca-Cola. This is interesting for two reasons: 1) this initiative started from the top — the higher-ups didn’t have to be convinced of the power of social media and 2) this blurs the traditional lines and roles that exist between PR and marketing teams.

    Tuggle made it clear that Coke knows that they don’t own the brand — the consumers own the brand. Thus, who better to trust to spread the message of happiness than those consumers? Mr. Tuggle reiterated the importance of authenticity, accountability and transparency when communicating with customers and is committed to making sure those are key parts of the Expedition 206 adventure.


    The Winners


    team-lg

    Team The MIX, Tony, Kelly and Antonio come from different backgrounds but are ready to work together to share the message of “Open Happiness” with the world. Tony is from Washington D.C., but has lived in Germany for the last two years, working as a kindergarten teacher. Kelly is a university student from Brussels who was born in South Africa. Antonio is a university student from Mexico City and has also spent time in Peurto Rico. Between the three of them they speak eight languages — which should come in handy when traveling around the world.

    All three winners are already well versed in social media. The team utilized Twitter and Facebook to garner votes for their team. It paid off too — 75% of the votes came from outside of the United States. Tony told me that they really want to push the boundaries of what they can do with the social web. Using video, photography, blog postings, Twitter, and social networks, the three will be sharing their adventure with the world as it happens.

    After the media blitz ends, Tony, Antonio and Kelly will head back home to tie-up loose ends and will meet in Madrid on January 1, 2010 to start their 365 day journey around the world.


    The Trip


    route_map-small

    With Expedition 206, Coke is really doing something unique. Not only are they letting the winners travel the globe to visit all 206 markets, they are going to utilize the social web along the way.

    This is how it works: other than airfare, the team members will have to make their own way across the world. They have a schedule of stops, but they have to get their own food, find their own places to stay and meet up with the locals themselves. The team is going to be given per diem for food and local travel, but what they do and where they do it is pretty much up to the team members — and the people at home interacting with the Expedition 206 team online.

    The team will be visiting the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, the FIFA World Cup in South Africa and the World Expo in Shanghai. They will be sharing their updates on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and other social networking sites. You can follow the progress on those channels or see the real-time lifestreams at Expedition206.com.

    Along the way, people at home can recommend places to stay or must-see attractions, restaurants to definitely visit — or avoid — and more. Who knows, if the team happens to be in your area — you might even want to meet up for a Coke or show them something cool in your area.

    The whole trip is all about interacting with people around the world and sharing the idea of happiness and connecting on a personal level and making connections that can exist beyond just language.


    The Future


    Are campaigns like Expedition 206 the future of social media? We hope so. Although the scale of Expedition 206 is obviously larger than what most social campaigns can be, the idea of connecting people globally using social media and real-life contact is something we hope other companies embrace.

    What do you think of Expedition 206? Will you be following the team’s progress as they make their way around the world?


    Reviews: Facebook, Flickr, Mashable, Twitter, YouTube

    Tags: coca cola, Coke, expedition 206

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 5:30 pm on November 17, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via TickleBooth by Ajit on 10/23/09


    One of the most original and beautiful motion graphics I’ve seen in a while.

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 5:13 pm on November 17, 2009 | 0 Permalink


    glowing-booze.jpg Apparently battery-powered illuminated liquor bottles are becoming all the rage. They’re supposed to grab your attention when you’re trying to decide what to order at the bar. Yeah, TOO BAD I ALREADY KNOW WHAT I WANT (one of everything — and keep the cherries coming).

    Ballantine’s new “Listen to Your Beat” campaign includes an electroluminescent label with graphic equalizer display. Designed by London-based “The Core,” this label is more evidence of a trend towards animated, self-illuminating liquor labels. Similar to these battery-powered T-shirts, audio references seem to occur frequently in youth-oriented liquor packaging. (The J&B bottle above is another example.)

    You know if you really want to sell liquor you don’t need ridiculous gimmicks like light-up bottles. No, what you need is me. I could sell firewater to a teetotaler AND get him to drink it. CHUG! CHUG! CHUG! Aaaaaand you’re vomiting on my shoes. Now wipe your mouth, we’re doing it again. Hit the jump for several videos of light-up bottles in action.

    Posted via email from sphereboy

     
  • sphereboy 5:06 pm on November 17, 2009 | 0 Permalink

    via Authentic Boredom by on 10/19/09


    I’m working on a covert project that may or may not be related to my next letterpress poster.

    This time-lapse video shows me attempting to recreate one of the glyphs featured in Libro di M. Giovambattista Palatino, which, again, may or may not be used in a poster involving letterpress.

    I captured the process using iShowU (Mac), sped it up 3000%, and edited it using Final Cut Express. Music is “Whispering Wind” by Moby.

    Posted via email from sphereboy